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Revolting: Five famous player...
Soccer

Revolting: Five famous player uprisings that caused havoc

Off The Ball
Off The Ball

15:44 6 Oct 2015

Talks between the Galway County Board, manager Antony Cunningham and the players have failed to resolve the impasse in the county which makes us think Galway could have a player revolt on their hands along with the departure of the manager.

However, the GAA isn't the only place where managers have been under pressure however. In the Premier League, both Brendan Rodgers and Dick Advocaat left their positions, and while the players weren't turning against them, there have been reports that his perceived scapegoating of certain players might be working against him. 

Recent history hasn't been so kind to managers who have lost the support of the dressing room.

1) David Moyes

It was the romantics choice. Cut from the same cloth, is how Sir Alex Ferguson described him and fellow Scot Moyes was left in charge of champions, Manchester United.

On the back of a season were they showed unrelenting desire to win a 20th league title, Robin van Persie guided United to glory and his hat-trick against Aston Villa at Old Trafford secured the championship for Fergie for a 13th time.

The winds of change swept through Manchester United, Ed Woodward replaced David Gill as executive vice-chairman and and David Moyes set about on his quest to move out of Fergie's shadow.

Some poor performances and a disastrous league campaign saw United finish 7th in the league and 10 months into a six year contract, Moyes was let go.

Prior to this, leaks had come from within the club that certain senior players were unhappy with his management style, the most vocal of which was Rio Ferdinand.

  

The Chosen One quickly turned out to be the wrong one in many fan's eyes. Image Credit: Mike Egerton / EMPICS Sport

In his autobiography, #2Sides, the former England international bemoaned the Scot's management style and criticised him for banning chips in the clubs canteen.

In an extract serialised by The Sun, Ferdinand admitted: "It's not something to go to the barricades over (the chips). But all the lads were p****d off. And guess what happened after Moyes left and Ryan Giggs took over?

"Moyes has been gone about 20 minutes, we're on the bikes warming up for the first training session and one of the lads says: 'You know what? We've got to get on to Giggsy. We've got to get him to get us our f*****g chips back.'”

A black mark on his CV, Moyes is rebuilding his reputation again following his departure from La Liga side, Real Sociedad.

2) Paolo Di Canio

An inglorious spell in charge on Sunderland ended at the beginning of the 2013/14 season saw the club earned only a solitary point from the opening five games of the season.

He succeeded in keeping Sunderland in the Premier Legaue, only just, after Martin O'Neill's departure from the club in March of 2013.

He was forced to deny speculation over whether he held fascist beliefs and also imposed some strict rules on the players regarding what the players could an d could not do.

Infamously, the Italian banned kectchup and mayonnaise from the player's diets, banned mobile phones on the training ground and banned drinking coffee, which he said affected a players mood before training or a match.

Speaking to talkSPORT radio this year he said: "If you have a car, a Ferrari, do you put sugar or salt in your engine? No you put petrol in – the right petrol.

“You need to start from the little things. I think a professional athlete at any level has to look after themselves.

“You have a specific diet in England and you can have a lot of ketchup and mayonnaise. I don’t think it’s a big sacrifice to help your stomach and liver to work better because it is your body system that helps you have less injuries, better performances in training sessions and to prepare yourself for the best match you can.”

After a raft of changes were made, 14 players were brought in and he did himself little service by fining seven of his squad in space of five days. 

His radical management style clearly impacted on dressing room morale and Di Canio was dismissed on account of their dismal results.

Di Canio takes training after his appointment in 2013. Image Credit: Scott Heppell / AP/Press Association Images

3) Raymond Domenech

The 2010 World Cup is rooted in the darkest days in France's footballing history.

We all know their route of qualification and the uproar it caused (mainly in Ireland) after Thierry Henry's handball gave William Gallas the opportunity to score and send Les Bleus to the finals.

Things weren't exactly rosy in the French camp and after a disappointing Group A loss to Mexico, Nicolas Anelka was sent home after a reported expletive-ridden outburst to the Domenech in the dressing room during a half-time team talk.

Further to this, his players then refused to train in an afternoon session after captain Patrice Evra had a row with fitness coach, Robert Duverne.

The team finished the campaign in defeat at the hands of South Africa and finished bottom of their group.

Nicolas Anelka and Raymond Domenech during training. Image Credit: Francois Mori / AP/Press Association Images

4) Guus Hiddink

While he didn't necessarily lose the support of the dressing room entirely, Guus Hiddink's Euro 1996 campaign with the Netherlands was marred by allegations of racism within the set-up.

Edgar Davids was unhappy with the fact that Hiddink had opted not to play him, after consulting with captain Danny Blind.

Then came the famous "We are the cabal" which saw the squad's black contingency [Edgar Davids, Clarence Seedorf, Patrick Kluivert, Michael Reiziger and Winston Bogarde] to be represented on a united front.

Headlines of discrimination emanated from their exit from the competition on penalties against France, after being one of the tournament favourites.

The infamous photo depicts the Dutch players of Surinamese descent sitting seperately to the rest of the group. Image Credit: Guus Dubbelman/Hollandse Hoogte Guus Dubbelman/Hollandse Hoogte / eyevine

The atmosphere in the camp then became more tense and with the dispute aired in the media, the situation only got worse.

Defender with PSV Eindhoven at the time, Arthur Numan told The Guardian: "When the atmosphere is not good in the camp you see it on the park. It's no surprise, when you're not a unit anymore." 

5) Teddy Holland

It wouldn't be a full and proper list if we didn't include the historic 2007/08 players strike down in Cork, when the Cork footballers and hurlers refused to play until their concerns were heard by the Cork County Board.

The cause of the strike was the issue of deciding who should pick the senior teams' selectors and the players believed the manager should pick the selectors.

However, it was the county board that was trusted to picking the selectors.

Teddy Holland, who had accepted the job of the football senior manager, had done somduring the time of the strike and therefore the players refused to play under his stewardship.

Holland was released by the board on February 18th 2008 and with arbitration came some of the following resolutions:

The Cork players committed not to engage in future strikes

Teddy Holland and his selectors were to resign from their positions

The new management would be able to pick their own selectors

A new management committee would be made up of five county board members and two players

 

Only five, surely we've missed some? Get us on Twitter @NewstalkSport and give us your suggestions.

Download the brand new OTB Sports App in the Play Store & App Store right now! We've got you covered!

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